Institute Core Faculty

Shelley Haley

Shelley Haley

Ph.D., Professor of Classics and Africana Studies

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A member of the Hamilton faculty since 1989, Haley's areas of interest are Roman literature and history; ancient Egypt; women's issues; and Africana studies. She earned a Ph.D. in classical studies from the University of Michigan. An expert on Cleopatra, Haley has appeared on the BBC's TimeWatch segment on Cleopatra, and was interviewed for The Learning Channel's series, "Rome: Power & Glory." She was a contributor to the African American Women Writers Series, 1910-1940 (1995) and has published articles in classical journals such as Historia, Classical World and Classica et Mediaevalia. Haley spent a month in South Africa in 1999, where she lectured on the classics as a foreign research fellow.

Haley served a four-year term as chief reader for the AP Latin Exam. As of July 1, she was appointed as the chair of the AP Latin Exam Development Committee. Haley has lectured nationally and internationally on the topic of increasing the representation of students of color in Latin, ancient Greek and classics classrooms. She has also lectured nationally and internationally on her research concerning the role of a classical education in the lives and careers of 19th century college-educated Black women. She published a chapter titled, "Lucian's 'Leaena and Clonarium'" Voyeurism or a Challenge to Assumptions?" in Nancy S. Rabinowitz and Lisa Auanger (eds.), Among Women: From the Homosocial to the Homoerotic in the Ancient World, Austin, TX: University of Texas Press (2002).

Haley was a Distinguished Visiting Scholar at Washington University-St. Louis in November 2002, and participated in the Oxford Round Table in April, 2003.

shaley@hamilton.edu »

Donald Carter

Donald Carter

Ph.D., Professor of Africana Studies

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Donald Martin Carter, professor of Africana Studies, came to Hamilton from the Department of Anthropology at Johns Hopkins University. He previously taught at Dickinson College and Stanford University. Carter received a Ph.D. from the University of Chicago and is author of States of Grace: Senegalese in Italy and the New European Immigration, published in 1997. His research interests include culture theory, racial formation, visual culture, Diaspora, invisibility and transnational cultural politics.

dcarter@hamilton.edu »

Heather Merrill

Heather Merrill

Ph.D., Associate Professor of Africana Studies and Geography

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Heather Merrill's research interests include feminist and postcolonial geographies, geographies of race, identity, migration and diaspora. Her book, An Alliance of Women: Immigration and the Politics of Race, was a result of her engagement with feminist anti-racist politics in the northern Italian industrial city of Turin during the 1990s. Merrill has published numerous articles, and in 2007 her book was the subject of a themed review discussion of transnationalist feminist practice in Gender Place and Culture. Her current writing is on interculturality and Italian feminism, multiculturalism and race in European discourse, immigration and the production of surplus populations in Italy. She has recently begun a comparative project on African Diasporic politics in Turin and Bologna. At Dickinson College, Merrill served as the executive director of the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues. She earned a master's in history and education from Teacher's College Columbia University, a master's in anthropology from the University of Chicago, and a master's and Ph.D in geography from the University of California at Berkeley.

hmerrill@hamilton.edu »

Nigel Westmaas

Nigel Westmaas

Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Africana Studies

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Nigel Westmaas, assistant professor Africana studies, joined the Hamilton faculty in 2006. He earned his master's and Ph.D. from SUNY Binghamton and bachelor's degree from the University of Guyana. He has published numerous articles in journals and magazines, including Against the Current, Small Axe, Emancipation Magazine and An Introductory Reader for Women's Studies in Guyana.

nwestmaa@hamilton.edu »

Angel David Nieves

Angel David Nieves

Ph.D., Chair & Associate Professor of Africana Studies

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Angel David Nieves is an associate professor of Africana Studies at Hamilton College, Clinton, N.Y. He is currently Co-Directing Hamilton's Digital Humanities Initiative (DHi) with Janet T. Simons. He taught in the School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation at the University of Maryland, College Park, from 2003-2008. Nieves completed his doctoral work in architectural history and Africana Studies at Cornell University in 2001. His co-edited book, 'We Shall Independent Be:' African American Place-Making and the Struggle to Claim Space in the U.S. (2008), examines African American efforts to claim space in American society despite fierce resistance. Nieves has published essays in the Journal of Planning History; Places Journal: A Forum of Design for the Public Realm; International Journal of Media and Cultural Politics; Safundi: The Journal of South African and American Studies; and in several edited collections, most recently in Places of Pain and Shame: Dealing With Difficult Heritage (2009). In May of 2010 he received The John R. Hatch Class of 1925 Excellence in Teaching Award. He is also the Associate Editor, of Fire!!!: A Multimedia Journal of Black Studies, a new on-line only journal of the Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH). His digital research and scholarship have also been featured on MSNBC.com and in Newsweek. Nieves' scholarly work and community-based activism critically engages with issues of memory, heritage preservation, gender and nationalism at the intersections of race and the built environment in cities across the Global South from New Orleans to Johannesburg, South Africa.

anieves@hamilton.edu »

Marla Jaksch

Marla Jaksch

Ph.D., Networked Institute Fellow

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Dr. Marla L. Jaksch is an Assistant Professor of Women's and Gender Studies at The College of New Jersey. She received her Ph.D. in Women's Studies and Art Education from The Pennsylvania State University and comes to TCNJ from Hamilton College.

Her research interests include: transnational feminisms, gender and development, indigenous rights and grassroots organizing, art and microfinance schemes, visual culture, cultural tourism, feminist pedagogies, and global service-learning.

She has developed and led various global field study and service-learning programs to Tanzania for more than 5 years.

Jaksch, a 2009-2010 Fulbright Scholar in Tanzania, has published essays in several journals, most recently in AlterNative: An International Journal of Indigenous Peoples, as well as authored book chapters. Additionally she has presented at several international and national conferences, workshops, and community meetings.

mljaksch@gmail.com »

Crystal Leigh Endsley

Crystal Leigh Endsley

Ph.D., Visiting Assistant Professor of Africana Studies;
Interim Coordinator, IGAS

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Crystal Leigh Endsley, is currently Visiting Assistant Professor in Africana Studies. Previously she was an Instructor in the Women's Studies Department at the Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania where she also served as Interim Assistant Director for the Paul Robeson Cultural Center. Endsley completed her graduate studies at Penn State's main campus where she earned a dual Ph.D. in Women's Studies and Curriculum & Instruction.

Her awards and honors include a Virginia Commission for the Arts Playwriting Grant in 2005, an honorable mention for the Lamar Kopp, J. Award for International Service in 2007, a James T. Sears Honorable Mention award for Outstanding Paper by the Curriculum and Pedagogy Council in 2008, and an Outstanding Graduate student Teaching Award from the Women's Studies Department at Penn State in 2008.

Endsley originally hails from Louisiana and Virginia Beach, Virginia and, in addition to her academic career, she is internationally recognized as a spoken word artist, activist, and actor, performing and presenting workshops and lectures both in the United States and abroad. Her performances and current research focus on issues of performance and identity and the ways they intersect with feminist pedagogy, race, and popular culture; Hip Hop and cultural production as activism; and the connections between academic/home communities, motherhood and knowledge production.

cendsley@hamilton.edu »

Gabriela Arias

Gabriela Arias

Student Fellow

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Gabriela Arias—Gabi for short—was born and raised in New York City; however, she has called Wallkill, NY home since 2001. As a member of the first generation of her family to be born in the United States, she is proud of her roots. She considers the African ancestry of Dominicans from across the diaspora central to her identity as a Dominican-American woman. The history and culture of Afro-Latinos fascinates her and is an academic interest which she has been fortunate enough to explore at Hamilton College. An Africana Studies major, Gabi is especially interested in the intersections between institutions of public history and the process of historical preservation in communities across the African diaspora. Throughout her college career, she researched the complex relationship between personal and family histories, particularly in marginalized communities, and their preservation in the archives. For the past two summers, Gabi held internships where she was engaged in digital archival work and humanities-based technology research. In 2009, she aided in building an online, interactive digital archive dedicated to the 1976 student protests in Soweto, South Africa. This summer, she delved into two exciting research based internships. First, at the Center for Puerto Rican Studies, Gabi processed and digitized their extensive collections on the LGBT Puerto Rican community in New York City. Second, she interned at El Museo del Barrio and aided in the development of their website and potential mobile application. An aspiring archivist, Gabi intends to begin graduate school in the fall of 2011 in a Library and Information Sciences program with an emphasis in cultural heritage archival preservation.

garias213@gmail.com »